Youmans (pronounced like 'yeoman' with an 's' added) is the best-kept secret among contemporary American writers. --John Wilson, ed., Books and Culture. / New at patreon.

Thursday, December 26, 2013

"favorite book of the year"

Clive Hicks-Jenkins, interior art from Thaliad
Phoenicia Publishing, 2012
Review clips and how to order
and Phoenicia site information

It's always grand when a fellow writer sheds light on one's creations. Thanks to Jeff Sypeck for reading Thaliad and saying how much he liked it again today as part of his year's roundup post at Quid Plura:
 P-p-p-poetry! This blog paid tribute to the late John Hollander and defended the much-maligned poetry expert “Dr. J. Evans Pritchard, Ph.D.” My favorite book of the year was Thaliad by Marly Youmans, a remarkable post-apocalyptic epic poem, and I kicked off what I hope will be a new tradition: writing an annual Christmas poem.
His review of Thaliad is here.

Jeff Sypeck is a writer living in Washington, D. C. He is the author of a book of poems inspired by the gargoyles of the National Cathedral, Looking Up, and Becoming Charlemagne: Europe, Baghdad, and the Empires of A.D. 800, as well as a translation of The Tale of Charlemagne and Ralph the Collier. 

I have enjoyed visiting his blog, which I might have discovered if he had not stumbled on to my writing. Bletted medlars! Gargoyles in America! Radishes and reading! Latin translations! It's all worth the visit. And I think that I'll go read his Christmas poem now...

4 comments:

  1. Note my apology to you at Jeff's blog. Thaliad is on its way.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oh, I did see it after I left a note! No need for apologies... My rooms are heaped with books to be read.

    Thank you, Tim!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks, Marly! Here's to a prolific 2014 for us all...

    ReplyDelete

Alas, I must once again remind large numbers of Chinese salesmen and other worldwide peddlers that if they fall into the Gulf of Spam, they will be eaten by roaming Balrogs. The rest of you, lovers of grace, poetry, and horses (nod to Yeats--you do not have to be fond of horses), feel free to leave fascinating missives and curious arguments.